Bioeconomy

The bioeconomy spans all of Europe’s important natural ecosystems: agriculture; aquaculture; forestry; and all the products and waste streams that arise from these activities. This includes food and feed, forest and crop residues, sewage and manure, bioenergy, biofuels, and bio-based chemicals and materials.

Key sectors in the bioeconomy
Agriculture

With more than 20 years of experience we can deliver the best services.

Aquaculture

With more than 20 years of experience we can deliver the best services.

Forestry

With more than 20 years of experience we can deliver the best services.

Waste management

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Biorefineries

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Bioeconomy in Europe

Why now?

Time is short and the bioeconomy can make an impact now, so that we can limit global warming to the 1.5 degrees target in the Paris agreement.

EU emissions from the energy and transport sectors need to halve from 2020 to 2030. The bioeconomy can rapidly decarbonise industries at scale in the crucial period before 2030, when electrification can first be expected to make a substantial impact.

The transport sector is already undergoing a big change and moving towards electrification at scale, however, to create significant decarbonisation now, there is a need to utilise the benefits of the bioeconomy. Sustainable biofuels will be needed in hard-to-abate sectors such as shipping, aviation and heavy-duty road transport as they transition to electrification in decades to come.

The bioeconomy can create a just, future-fit economy, rather than restoring one no longer fit for purpose.

Unleashing the potential of the Bioeconomy

Supporting the bioeconomy is crucial for the health of our planet as well as contributing to sustainable growth in Europe. It is vital for achieving the goals of the European Green Deal and becoming the world’s first climate-neutral continent by 2050.

A thriving bioeconomy will reduce greenhouse gas emissions through a combination of sustainable forestry, better agricultural practices, bioenergy and more efficient use of waste. It will bring rural communities and regions back into the heart of the European economy and enable the Green Deal’s “Farm to Fork” programme by fostering new green jobs, stimulating innovation and contributing to a more circular economy, while also bringing other social and environmental benefits.